What Emotionally Strong People Don’t Do

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  • They don’t accept that each feeling they have implies something
  • They aren’t undermined by not being correct
  • They don’t utilize rationale to deny their feelings
  • They don’t extend significance onto all that they see
  • They don’t have to demonstrate their force
  • They don’t keep away from torment, regardless of whether they fear it
  • They don’t search out others’ imperfections with an end goal to reduce their qualities
  • They don’t say anything negative
  • They don’t sift through specific parts of and encounter to catastrophize it
  • They don’t keep a rundown of things individuals “ought to” or “shouldn’t do”
  • They don’t see themselves as adjudicator of what’s correct
  • They don’t make general determinations from their own encounters
  • They don’t change their character dependent on who they’re near
  • They can tolerate upping for themselves without being forceful or cautious
  • They don’t accept that his is consistently the manner in which their life will be

Until my next post, why not check out my YA novels about mental illness, memoir writing, novel in verse, or even my Native American mystery series on Amazon, or follow me on TwitterInstagramFacebookGoodreadsLinkedInBookbub , BookSprout, or AllAuthor.

Cognitive Biases that Create the Way You Experience Life

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  1. Projection—our preferences are projected towards what we see and interpret accordingly.
  2. Extrapolation—when we use our present circumstances to analyze our entire life
  3. Anchoring—the first information we hear tends to influence the way we perceive things
  4. Negativity—selective attention makes us pay attention to bad news
  5. Conservatism—when you rely on information you had earlier
  6. Clustering illusion—when your subconscious mind starts seeing patterns in random events
  7. Confirmation—occurs when the information we listen to supports or encourages our ideas
  8. Choice-supportive—the way we make choices towards things we see as beneficial and disregarding the flaws that come with it

Until my next post, why not check out my YA novels about mental illness, memoir writing, novel in verse, or even my Native American mystery series on Amazon, or follow me on TwitterInstagramFacebookGoodreadsLinkedInBookbub , BookSprout, or AllAuthor.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

cognitivebehavioraltherapy

This will be my last week of cognitive behavioral therapy. I only tried it because my family pleaded but due to time and expense it is no longer an option. Plus I don’t think that I’m in that category of those whom it helps the most. CBT is a common adjunct to meds when the person with schizophrenia is stabilized but continues to have a baseline of functional disturbances. It is commonly done with exercises out of a workbook given to the client by the psychotherapist. CBT has both behavioral and cognitive aspects.

cognitive behavior therapy

Regarding behavior, CBT is supposed to weaken the mental connection to troublesome situations and thereby altering the reactions (fear, depression or anger). The cognitive component of CBT targets thought patterns and seeks to alter the emotional state and corresponding behaviors. My psychotherapist worked with me to make me aware of my irrational beliefs and alter them through cognitive restructuring (behavior modification). I did cognitive rehearsal and practiced different responses to different situations that I encountered. Not only did I have workbook exercises but I also was required to journal which this blogging assisted with over the time I tried out CBT. Overall the positive reinforcement and systematic desensitization helped me learn new tactics to handle my illness.

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