Cognitive Biases that Create the Way You Experience Life

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  1. Projection—our preferences are projected towards what we see and interpret accordingly.
  2. Extrapolation—when we use our present circumstances to analyze our entire life
  3. Anchoring—the first information we hear tends to influence the way we perceive things
  4. Negativity—selective attention makes us pay attention to bad news
  5. Conservatism—when you rely on information you had earlier
  6. Clustering illusion—when your subconscious mind starts seeing patterns in random events
  7. Confirmation—occurs when the information we listen to supports or encourages our ideas
  8. Choice-supportive—the way we make choices towards things we see as beneficial and disregarding the flaws that come with it

Until my next post, why not check out my YA novels about mental illness, memoir writing, novel in verse, or even my Native American mystery series on Amazon, or follow me on TwitterInstagramFacebookGoodreadsLinkedInBookbub , BookSprout, or AllAuthor.

35 Things to Think of Instead of What’s Consuming You

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  1. How do you see your life 5, 10, or 20 years from now?
  2. The level of progress you have made already this year
  3. The little things you do that change the quality of your life
  4. Your situation as pathway to your dreams
  5. Appreciating the little things
  6. What your life looks like to others
  7. What you have effectively achieved in your life
  8. What different choices exist outside of your default perspective?
  9. How you might conceivably invest more energy into said work that merits your time and consideration.
  10. How you can help others
  11. Other individuals’ inspirations and wants
  12. The truth that you don’t think the specific way others’ think, and maybe the issues you have with them are not issues
  13. The examples of individuals you know, and what they inform you regarrding whom they truly are
  14. The truth that we accept individuals as we envision them
  15. What you would say in the event that you could tell your more youthful self only a certain something
  16. What your overall goal is
  17. What you’d put in the one box at the off chance that you needed to move to the opposite side of the country and could only bring just that
  18. How much your pet loves you
  19. What your future self would think and say regarding whatever circumstance you’re in the present moment
  20. The greatest evenings of your life
  21. The reality that it is difficult to do everything
  22. Aesthetics that you love
  23. Your life’s stories
  24. Your dream minutes
  25. What moves you could make to move yourself forward to the existence you need
  26. The sensation of the sun on your skin or the wind in your hair
  27. The smell of newly cut grass or the smell of an approaching rain
  28. What you can do with your minutes rather than your hours or days
  29. Who you are at the point no one is near
  30. Melodies of tunes that make you content
  31. What characteristics you respect most in others
  32. How limitless the universe is
  33. What “yes” feels like to you
  34. How numerous arbitrary, chance events were associated with essentially every significant headway in your life
  35. A mantra which works to help your resolute conviction that the future will be unique, and you’ll sort out someway to work everything out

Until my next post, why not check out my YA novels about mental illness, memoir writing, novel in verse, or even my Native American mystery series on Amazon, or follow me on TwitterInstagramFacebookGoodreadsLinkedInBookbub , BookSprout, or AllAuthor.

Book review: The Mountain is You by Brianna Wiest

Transforming Self-Sabotage Into Self-Mastery

This is a poetic and deeply personal self-help book where the information flows in an elegant and organic way that makes the lessons and life tips less jarring to discuss. Even the book’s disjointed structure makes even the most technical topics easier to discuss. The author starts by differentiating intrusive versus intuitive thoughts and explains the science behind the gut response. The physical effects of trauma and unprocessed emotions also astound which makes it one of the book’s most life-changing insights.

Wiest also tackles relationships and comfort zones and the patterns that are set whether healthy or abusive. This helps one realize that we’re drawn to such people and circumstances because we’re familiar with it and familiarity breeds comfort, even if not conscious about it. The only downside to the book is that the sources were somewhat outdated going back to 2008 when the book was published in 2020 and new discoveries could’ve rendered such studies unreliable. Another drawback is the repetitiveness of insights as opposed to gleaning new ones.

But all in all, this book addresses the problematic mindsets of today, especially about happiness, healing, and relationships. I think this book would be best for young people that are just beginning to define their identity. I appreciated this book’s poetic writing style and informal tone most of all. Get the entire book here.

Until my next post, why not check out my YA novels about mental illness, memoir writing, or even my Native American mystery series on Amazon, or follow me on TwitterInstagramFacebookGoodreadsLinkedInBookbub , BookSprout, or AllAuthor.

Book review: Turtles All the Way Down by John Green

Dutton Books, 2017

Turtles All The Way Down by John Green is a masterfully crafted book that accurately depicts life with a mental illness by tapping into the spiraling world of a teenage mind. The empathetic narrative also offers a bevy of memorable voices. The story follows a young girl named Aza, who is reunited with her fugitive billionaire friend, Davis, whose dad has gone missing. Aza struggles to juggle school, her social life, and her family, while having to deal with the never-ending spiral of her own thoughts. Even though she struggles so much, she is still smart and loved so dearly offering a balanced depiction.

The way Aza’s struggle was put into words was incredible, and it portrays mental illness so accurately. I related to Aza’s journey. Aza’s mental illness never goes away or is cured, and nothing is glossed over, cured, or romanticized. The relationships in this book are very authentic as well because the mental health representation is spot on. It may give someone a character to relate to or give someone else a greater understanding of mental.

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